Physicians Anonymous

Our stories

Physician therapy

A closer look at physician therapy vs coaching

So the new year is near, and physicians everywhere are planning to make 2024 an even better one. Our intentions may be to engage in more self-care, develop a better LIFE-work-balance, and learn about ourselves in an “examined life”. In this context, the debate between therapy and coaching for physicians takes center stage, raising important questions about the most suitable approach for addressing the unique challenges faced by medical professionals.

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To therapy or not? That is the question.

An examined medical life

As a trained psychiatrist, workaholic, depressive, and (formerly) excellent clinician, I’ve come to the following maxim with apologies to REM: “Everybody needs a little therapy (sometimes)”. As the year winds down and the nights draw in, we are taking time to reflect on 2023. Over the next weeks over the Holidays and after we ring in the new year, Physicians Anonymous will be publishing a series on self-examination.

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Physicians anonymous report 2023

Physicians Anonymous Report (2023)

We’ve achieved a TON in 2023, especially as we are self-funded and run by volunteers. So from 2024- HOW do we reach the suffering physician? How do we let our colleagues know that there is a safe place where they can be human first, healer second? Where they will not be judged, but they will be heard and loved. Where we can laugh and cry together bonded by the commonality of being wounded healers.

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Solve quiet quitting

Solving quiet quitting in medicine

Unlike overt resignations, quiet quitting manifests as a subtle withdrawal, marked by disengagement and diminished job satisfaction. To effectively address this issue, it is imperative to delve into the scale of the problem, understand the causes behind this quiet exodus, and propose actionable solutions tailored to mitigate its impact.

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Quietly quitting medicine

As I sit down to reflect on my decision to quit a toxic hospital workplace, I’m overwhelmed by a mix of emotions – relief, anger, and sadness. Leaving a career I had worked so hard for, after just three years as an attending physician, was not an easy choice.

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Institutional betrayal in corporate medicine

Institutional betrayal in corporate medicine

Institutional betrayal in corporate medicine refers to instances in which physicians or other healthcare professionals feel that their employers have acted against their best interests, or violated their trust. This can occur in a number of different ways, from unfair treatment of staff to unethical business practices, and can have wide-ranging effects on both staff and patients.

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Physician Love Poem

We hope that, on this Valentine’s day when romantic love is celebrated, you got to spend some time with those you love. You are very loved by us here at Physicians Anonymous. So we wrote you all a little love poem.

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Stressed doctor I'm fine

I am FINE*

Depending on which brand of English you speak, fine might be “awesome”, “doing great”, or “things could not be better”.
Often, however, “I’m fine” is just a throwaway term without meaning. If you are a physician, there’s a >6 in 10 chance you are NOT fine. Read on to find out more.

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hippocrates

Hippocrates or hypocrisy

Few of us swear by Apollo the physician, and Asclepius, and Hygieia and Panacea. But all of us know, “First do no harm,” (which is actually a misquote from the Hippocratic Oath). The Oath underpins much of modern medical ethics and professionalism. Most of us ascribe to these broad principles, but in conversations with distressed colleagues, it is apparent that there are a minority of us who seem to be mired in hypocrisy rather than Hippocrates.

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Coaching solution to physician burnout

Coaching: a solution to physician burnout?

Research suggesting low rates of help-seeking behavior among physicians. Yet an encouraging recent study showed that some 70% of physicians would engage with a professional coach. We argue that this openness to coaching provides a much-needed support system and a potential solution to the current pandemic of physician burnout and suicide.

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physician self care

Physician self care is not selfish

Physician self care is not selfish. It’s essential to thriving in medicine. This article will explore barriers to physician self care and help physicians develop self-care practices for their physical, emotional, spiritual and intellectual health.

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second victim syndrome

“Second victim” trauma in medicine

When things go wrong, it is easy to focus only on the “first victim” and forget those around them affected by the error – especially the clinician who made a mistake, also known as the “second victim” in medicine.

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Physician Suicide Prevention and Wellbeing Resources

Global Physician Suicide Prevention and Wellbeing Resources

Physicians Anonymous humbly hosts this living document of global resources for physician support.

Search: Scroll down to your country or press Ctrl+F and enter your keyword to search.

If you would like to add resources or your country please Contact us or leave details in the comments below.

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overcome cognitive distortions

Cognitive distortions in medicine – part 2

Cognitive distortions are exaggerated or irrational thoughts that we have. In Part 2 of this article, by learning to tackle common cognitive distortions, you will be empowered to manage your amazing mind and smooth over the bumps in the road of a career in medicine.

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Cognitive distortions in medicine

Cognitive distortions in medicine – part 1

Extreme stress tends to bring out more of these cognitive distortions, and modern medicine is a rich source of stress for doctors and medical students. We give 6 examples of classic cognitive distortions as applied to medicine, and discover ways to challenge them with more realistic thinking.

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Christmas in hospital as a physician

Christmas in hospital as a physician

T’was the night before Christmas, and all through the ER, everyone was stirring, shouting, vomiting, and hemorrhaging. Except for the mice, who very sensibly stayed away, because it was chaos.

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Coaching for resident burnout prevention

Coaching for resident burnout prevention

This article explores why residents are at even higher risk of burnout and mental health deterioration than the average physician population. We then look at the evidence base for resident burnout prevention programs and consider why postgraduate education providers should seriously consider investing in these. Mindfulness and Coaching programs are examined as having the most evidence-base.

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Trauma hospital ER

Why I quit medicine: not COVID but COVID didn’t help

I recently decided I was going to leave my role as an Emergency Medicine (ER) doctor in the UK National Health Service (NHS). As service after service reaches its full capacity and beyond, the people who rely on these services do not know where to go for the help they need. All of these factors led me do decide that I no longer wanted to commit my daily energies to a system that was causing me to burn out.

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